Recipe index

All recipes are now indexed here. Each link opens into a new tab.

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Dairy-freeGluten-freePantryQuickVeganVegetarian
FallWinterSpringSummer

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AmericanAsianCanadianChineseFrenchGreekHolidayItalianJapanese – JewishLatvian – MexicanMiddle EasternThaiThanksgiving

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Breads and muffinsBiscuitsBreakfast and brunchCanningCheeseCompotes, jams, jellies, and marmaladesDips and spreadsDoughnutsEggsFish and shellfishFruitsGrainsMeatNuts and seedsPastaPickles – Pizzas and flatbreadsSaladsSavory pastry – Sides – SconesSoup – TreatsVegetables

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Treats

Bar cookiesCandy – CookiesCakesChocolateCrumblesIce cream and sorbetPiesPuddings, mousses, and custards

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Fruits

ApplesBlackberries – BlueberriesClementines – CherriesCoconut – Cranberries – Currants – DatesGrapefruitHuskcherriesLemonLimes – Mango – Peaches – Pineapple – QuincesRaisinsRhubarb* – Strawberries

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Vegetables

Arugula/rocketBeans and lentilsBeets – CabbageCarrotsCauliflowerCorn – CucumberDaikon – EggplantLeeksMushroomsOnionsParsnipsPotatoesScallionsShallotsSquashSwiss chardWater chestnutsWatercress

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Fish and shellfish

SalmonTilapia

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Grains

CornmealCouscous* – Farina/cream of wheat – Oats

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Meat

ChickenLambPorkSausage

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Nuts and seeds

AlmondsPecans – PeanutsPine nutsPoppy seedsPumpkin seedsWalnuts

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Miscellaneous

Coffee

*Please note that couscous and rhubarb are filed under Grains and Fruits, respectively, despite being a pasta and a vegetable, respectively. Most people treat couscous as a grain and rhubarb as a fruit so I filed them that way for convenience’s sake. Whenever I get around to cooking something with tomatoes they will be filed under Vegetables, despite being a fruit. Normally I’m a bit of a pedant (that sound you hear is everyone I know laughing like crazy) but sometimes even I bow to common usage…

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§ 2 Responses to Recipe index

  • Jason says:

    To be pedantic myself, fruits and vegetables have different definitions depending on whether or not you’re defining them culinarily, nutritionally, or botanically. So, it’s not “common usage” per se to define a rhubarb as a fruit or a tomato as a vegetable in the culinary sense, if they’re used in a savory fashion.

    • kristina says:

      Very true. As so many people I know like to point out the scientific definitions (hazard of having so many scientist relatives and friends), I felt obliged to acknowledge there’s some controversy over this topic!

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